What Is The Majority Draw In Boxing?

Table of Contents

Boxing is an ancient sport that has been enjoyed by millions of people for centuries. The rules of boxing are straightforward, and there are only a few ways to win a match. Knocking out the opponent, forcing the referee to stop the fight, or winning the points by outscoring the other boxer. However, in some cases, the judges might score the match a draw. This is known as a majority draw, and it is a common occurrence in boxing matches.

 

Definition of Majority Draw in Boxing

A majority draw occurs when two judges score the match a draw, while the third judge scores the match in favor of one of the boxers. In such a situation, the boxer who was favored by the lone judge is declared the winner, while the other two judges’ scores cancel each other out, and the match is considered a draw. The majority draws are rare in boxing, but they do happen, and they are a part of the sport.

 

When does the Majority Draw Happen in Boxing?

A majority draw happens when the judges cannot decide on a winner. This typically happens when the two boxers are evenly matched, and neither of them is able to land a decisive blow or take control of the match. Majority draws are more common in close fights where the scorecards are close, and the judges have a hard time determining a winner. Majority draws are also more likely to happen in championship matches or when two highly-ranked boxers face off against each other.

 

How do Judges Score a Boxing Match?

Judges score boxing matches using a ten-point system. The winner of each round is awarded ten points, and the loser is awarded nine points. If the round is considered a draw, both boxers are awarded ten points. At the end of the match, the judges add up their scorecards, and the boxer with the higher score is declared the winner. If the scores are tied, the match is considered a draw. However, if two of the three judges score the match a draw, and the third judge scores it in favor of one of the boxers, the match is considered a majority draw.

 

What Happens in the Event of a Majority Draw?

In the event of a majority draw, the boxer who was favored by the lone judge is declared the winner. The other two judges’ scores are canceled out, and the match is considered a draw. This means that the boxer who was favored by the lone judge has won the match, but the match is not considered a victory. The other boxer does not lose the match, and their record does not reflect a loss. The result of a majority draw is essentially a tie, and neither boxer wins or loses.

 

Examples of Major Draw in Boxing

There have been many examples of majority draws in boxing over the years. One of the most famous examples occurred in 1999 when Evander Holyfield fought Lennox Lewis in a championship match. The match was scored a majority draw, with two judges scoring it 115-113 in favor of Holyfield, and one judge scoring it 115-115. Another famous example of a majority draw occurred in 2002 when Oscar De La Hoya fought Fernando Vargas. The match was scored a majority draw, with two judges scoring it 114-114 and one judge scoring it 115-113 in favor of De La Hoya.

 

Conclusion

In conclusion, majority draw is a term used in boxing when the judges cannot agree on a winner. It occurs when two of the three judges score the bout as a draw, while the other judge gives the fight to one of the fighters. This result may be frustrating for both fighters and their fans, as they feel that a clear winner was not determined. Majority draws are uncommon but can happen in close and competitive fights where both fighters show impressive skills and abilities. In such situations, a rematch may be necessary to determine a clear winner.

Maxim Tzfenko

Maxim Tzfenko

"I live and breath Martial Arts"

Recent Posts